Volume 3, Issue 4

2007


1. Interpolant-Based Transition Relation Approximation

Jhala, Ranjit ; McMillan, Kenneth L..
In predicate abstraction, exact image computation is problematic, requiring in the worst case an exponential number of calls to a decision procedure. For this reason, software model checkers typically use a weak approximation of the image. This can result in a failure to prove a property, even given an adequate set of predicates. We present an interpolant-based method for strengthening the abstract transition relation in case of such failures. This approach guarantees convergence given an adequate set of predicates, without requiring an exact image computation. We show empirically that the method converges more rapidly than an earlier method based on counterexample analysis.

2. A Note on Shortest Developments

Sørensen, Morten Heine.
De Vrijer has presented a proof of the finite developments theorem which, in addition to showing that all developments are finite, gives an effective reduction strategy computing longest developments as well as a simple formula computing their length. We show that by applying a rather simple and intuitive principle of duality to de Vrijer's approach one arrives at a proof that some developments are finite which in addition yields an effective reduction strategy computing shortest developments as well as a simple formula computing their length. The duality fails for general beta-reduction. Our results simplify previous work by Khasidashvili.

3. Interactive Small-Step Algorithms I: Axiomatization

Blass, Andreas ; Gurevich, Yuri ; Rosenzweig, Dean ; Rossman, Benjamin.
In earlier work, the Abstract State Machine Thesis -- that arbitrary algorithms are behaviorally equivalent to abstract state machines -- was established for several classes of algorithms, including ordinary, interactive, small-step algorithms. This was accomplished on the basis of axiomatizations of these classes of algorithms. Here we extend the axiomatization and, in a companion paper, the proof, to cover interactive small-step algorithms that are not necessarily ordinary. This means that the algorithms (1) can complete a step without necessarily waiting for replies to all queries from that step and (2) can use not only the environment's replies but also the order in which the replies were received.

4. Interactive Small-Step Algorithms II: Abstract State Machines and the<br> Characterization Theorem

Blass, Andreas ; Gurevich, Yuri ; Rosenzweig, Dean ; Rossman, Benjamin.
In earlier work, the Abstract State Machine Thesis -- that arbitrary algorithms are behaviorally equivalent to abstract state machines -- was established for several classes of algorithms, including ordinary, interactive, small-step algorithms. This was accomplished on the basis of axiomatizations of these classes of algorithms. In Part I (Interactive Small-Step Algorithms I: Axiomatization), the axiomatization was extended to cover interactive small-step algorithms that are not necessarily ordinary. This means that the algorithms (1) can complete a step without necessarily waiting for replies to all queries from that step and (2) can use not only the environment's replies but also the order in which the replies were received. In order to prove the thesis for algorithms of this generality, we extend here the definition of abstract state machines to incorporate explicit attention to the relative timing of replies and to the possible absence of replies. We prove the characterization theorem for extended abstract state machines with respect to general algorithms as axiomatized in Part I.

5. Model Checking Synchronized Products of Infinite Transition Systems

Wöhrle, Stefan ; Thomas, Wolfgang.
Formal verification using the model checking paradigm has to deal with two aspects: The system models are structured, often as products of components, and the specification logic has to be expressive enough to allow the formalization of reachability properties. The present paper is a study on what can be achieved for infinite transition systems under these premises. As models we consider products of infinite transition systems with different synchronization constraints. We introduce finitely synchronized transition systems, i.e. product systems which contain only finitely many (parameterized) synchronized transitions, and show that the decidability of FO(R), first-order logic extended by reachability predicates, of the product system can be reduced to the decidability of FO(R) of the components. This result is optimal in the following sense: (1) If we allow semifinite synchronization, i.e. just in one component infinitely many transitions are synchronized, the FO(R)-theory of the product system is in general undecidable. (2) We cannot extend the expressive power of the logic under consideration. Already a weak extension of first-order logic with transitive closure, where we restrict the transitive closure operators to arity one and nesting depth two, is undecidable for an asynchronous (and hence finitely synchronized) product, namely for the infinite grid.

6. A Characterisation of First-Order Constraint Satisfaction Problems

Larose, Benoit ; Loten, Cynthia ; Tardif, Claude.
We describe simple algebraic and combinatorial characterisations of finite relational core structures admitting finitely many obstructions. As a consequence, we show that it is decidable to determine whether a constraint satisfaction problem is first-order definable: we show the general problem to be NP-complete, and give a polynomial-time algorithm in the case of cores. A slight modification of this algorithm provides, for first-order definable CSP's, a simple poly-time algorithm to produce a solution when one exists. As an application of our algebraic characterisation of first order CSP's, we describe a large family of L-complete CSP's.

7. Decisive Markov Chains

Abdulla, Parosh Aziz ; Henda, Noomene Ben ; Mayr, Richard.
We consider qualitative and quantitative verification problems for infinite-state Markov chains. We call a Markov chain decisive w.r.t. a given set of target states F if it almost certainly eventually reaches either F or a state from which F can no longer be reached. While all finite Markov chains are trivially decisive (for every set F), this also holds for many classes of infinite Markov chains. Infinite Markov chains which contain a finite attractor are decisive w.r.t. every set F. In particular, this holds for probabilistic lossy channel systems (PLCS). Furthermore, all globally coarse Markov chains are decisive. This class includes probabilistic vector addition systems (PVASS) and probabilistic noisy Turing machines (PNTM). We consider both safety and liveness problems for decisive Markov chains, i.e., the probabilities that a given set of states F is eventually reached or reached infinitely often, respectively. 1. We express the qualitative problems in abstract terms for decisive Markov chains, and show an almost complete picture of its decidability for PLCS, PVASS and PNTM. 2. We also show that the path enumeration algorithm of Iyer and Narasimha terminates for decisive Markov chains and can thus be used to solve the approximate quantitative safety problem. A modified variant of this algorithm solves the approximate quantitative liveness problem. 3. Finally, we show that the exact probability of (repeatedly) reaching F cannot be effectively expressed (in a uniform […]

8. Coinductive Proof Principles for Stochastic Processes

Kozen, Dexter.
We give an explicit coinduction principle for recursively-defined stochastic processes. The principle applies to any closed property, not just equality, and works even when solutions are not unique. The rule encapsulates low-level analytic arguments, allowing reasoning about such processes at a higher algebraic level. We illustrate the use of the rule in deriving properties of a simple coin-flip process.

9. The Church Synthesis Problem with Parameters

Rabinovich, Alexander.
For a two-variable formula &psi;(X,Y) of Monadic Logic of Order (MLO) the Church Synthesis Problem concerns the existence and construction of an operator Y=F(X) such that &psi;(X,F(X)) is universally valid over Nat. Büchi and Landweber proved that the Church synthesis problem is decidable; moreover, they showed that if there is an operator F that solves the Church Synthesis Problem, then it can also be solved by an operator defined by a finite state automaton or equivalently by an MLO formula. We investigate a parameterized version of the Church synthesis problem. In this version &psi; might contain as a parameter a unary predicate P. We show that the Church synthesis problem for P is computable if and only if the monadic theory of <Nat,<,P> is decidable. We prove that the Büchi-Landweber theorem can be extended only to ultimately periodic parameters. However, the MLO-definability part of the Büchi-Landweber theorem holds for the parameterized version of the Church synthesis problem.

10. Verification of Ptime Reducibility for system F Terms: Type Inference in<br> Dual Light Affine Logic

Atassi, Vincent ; Baillot, Patrick ; Terui, Kazushige.
In a previous work Baillot and Terui introduced Dual light affine logic (DLAL) as a variant of Light linear logic suitable for guaranteeing complexity properties on lambda calculus terms: all typable terms can be evaluated in polynomial time by beta reduction and all Ptime functions can be represented. In the present work we address the problem of typing lambda-terms in second-order DLAL. For that we give a procedure which, starting with a term typed in system F, determines whether it is typable in DLAL and outputs a concrete typing if there exists any. We show that our procedure can be run in time polynomial in the size of the original Church typed system F term.

11. Generic Trace Semantics via Coinduction

Hasuo, Ichiro ; Jacobs, Bart ; Sokolova, Ana.
Trace semantics has been defined for various kinds of state-based systems, notably with different forms of branching such as non-determinism vs. probability. In this paper we claim to identify one underlying mathematical structure behind these "trace semantics," namely coinduction in a Kleisli category. This claim is based on our technical result that, under a suitably order-enriched setting, a final coalgebra in a Kleisli category is given by an initial algebra in the category Sets. Formerly the theory of coalgebras has been employed mostly in Sets where coinduction yields a finer process semantics of bisimilarity. Therefore this paper extends the application field of coalgebras, providing a new instance of the principle "process semantics via coinduction."

12. A proof of strong normalisation using domain theory

Coquand, Thierry ; Spiwack, Arnaud.
Ulrich Berger presented a powerful proof of strong normalisation using domains, in particular it simplifies significantly Tait's proof of strong normalisation of Spector's bar recursion. The main contribution of this paper is to show that, using ideas from intersection types and Martin-Lof's domain interpretation of type theory one can in turn simplify further U. Berger's argument. We build a domain model for an untyped programming language where U. Berger has an interpretation only for typed terms or alternatively has an interpretation for untyped terms but need an extra condition to deduce strong normalisation. As a main application, we show that Martin-Löf dependent type theory extended with a program for Spector double negation shift.