Selected Papers of the Ninth International Conference on Computability and Complexity in Analysis (CCA) 2012

2012

Editors: Klaus Weihrauch, Arno Pauly, Martín Escardó, Matthias Schröder

This special issue of the journal Logical Methods in Computer Science (LMCS) contains a number of selected articles related to the Ninth International Conference on Computability and Complexity in Analysis (CCA 2012) that took place from 24-27 June 2012 in Cambridge, UK, see http://cca-net.de/cca2012/. Most of these articles are based on papers that were presented at this conference. The conference and this special issue are concerned with computable analysis, the theory of computability and complexity over real-valued data. The contributions to this special issue cover several topics of current research including classical topics of computable analysis and constructive analysis, computable measure theory, algorithmic randomness and computational complexity. All articles in this special issue have been carefully refereed according to the usual high standards of the journal LMCS and our discipline. We would like to thank all authors for their contributions to this special issue and all referees for their thorough and careful work. We would also like to use this opportunity to thank all members of the organizing committee of the conference CCA 2012 and all sponsors for their generous support. The help and support from LMCS is kindly acknowledged. Martín Escardó, Arno Pauly, Matthias Schröder, Klaus Weihrauch Special Issue Editors


1. Computability of Probability Distributions and Characteristic Functions

Takakazu Mori ; Yoshiki Tsujii ; Mariko Yasugi.
As a part of our works on effective properties of probability distributions, we deal with the corresponding characteristic functions. A sequence of probability distributions is computable if and only if the corresponding sequence of characteristic functions is computable. As for the onvergence problem, the effectivized Glivenko's theorem holds. Effectivizations of Bochner's theorem and de Moivre-Laplace central limit theorem are also proved.

2. Randomness extraction and asymptotic Hamming distance

Cameron E. Freer ; Bjoern Kjos-Hanssen.
We obtain a non-implication result in the Medvedev degrees by studying sequences that are close to Martin-Löf random in asymptotic Hamming distance. Our result is that the class of stochastically bi-immune sets is not Medvedev reducible to the class of sets having complex packing dimension 1.

3. Approximation systems for functions in topological and in metric spaces

Dimiter Skordev.
A notable feature of the TTE approach to computability is the representation of the argument values and the corresponding function values by means of infinitistic names. Two ways to eliminate the using of such names in certain cases are indicated in the paper. The first one is intended for the case of topological spaces with selected indexed denumerable bases. Suppose a partial function is given from one such space into another one whose selected base has a recursively enumerable index set, and suppose that the intersection of base open sets in the first space is computable in the sense of Weihrauch-Grubba. Then the ordinary TTE computability of the function is characterized by the existence of an appropriate recursively enumerable relation between indices of base sets containing the argument value and indices of base sets containing the corresponding function value.This result can be regarded as an improvement of a result of Korovina and Kudinov. The second way is applicable to metric spaces with selected indexed denumerable dense subsets. If a partial function is given from one such space into another one, then, under a semi-computability assumption concerning these spaces, the ordinary TTE computability of the function is characterized by the existence of an appropriate recursively enumerable set of quadruples. Any of them consists of an index of element from the selected dense subset in the first space, a natural number encoding a rational bound for the distance between […]

4. Compact manifolds with computable boundaries

Zvonko Iljazovic.
We investigate conditions under which a co-computably enumerable closed set in a computable metric space is computable and prove that in each locally computable computable metric space each co-computably enumerable compact manifold with computable boundary is computable. In fact, we examine the notion of a semi-computable compact set and we prove a more general result: in any computable metric space each semi-computable compact manifold with computable boundary is computable. In particular, each semi-computable compact (boundaryless) manifold is computable.

5. Strong Turing Degrees for Additive BSS RAM's

Christine Gaßner.
For the additive real BSS machines using only constants 0 and 1 and order tests we consider the corresponding Turing reducibility and characterize some semi-decidable decision problems over the reals. In order to refine, step-by-step, a linear hierarchy of Turing degrees with respect to this model, we define several halting problems for classes of additive machines with different abilities and construct further suitable decision problems. In the construction we use methods of the classical recursion theory as well as techniques for proving bounds resulting from algebraic properties. In this way we extend a known hierarchy of problems below the halting problem for the additive machines using only equality tests and we present a further subhierarchy of semi-decidable problems between the halting problems for the additive machines using only equality tests and using order tests, respectively.

6. Locating Ax, where A is a subspace of B(H)

Douglas Suth Bridges.
Let A be a linear space of operators on a Hilbert space H, x a vector in H, and Ax the subspace of H comprising all vectors of the form Tx with T in A. We discuss, within a Bishop-style constructive framework, conditions under which the projection [Ax] of H on the closure of Ax exists. We derive a general result that leads directly to both the open mapping theorem and our main theorem on the existence of [Ax].

7. Computing a Solution of Feigenbaum's Functional Equation in Polynomial Time

Peter Hertling ; Christoph Spandl.
Lanford has shown that Feigenbaum's functional equation has an analytic solution. We show that this solution is a polynomial time computable function. This implies in particular that the so-called first Feigenbaum constant is a polynomial time computable real number.