Selected Papers of the 30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019)

Editors: W. J. Fokkink and Rob van Glabbeek.

1. Of Cores: A Partial-Exploration Framework for Markov Decision Processes

Jan Křetínský ; Tobias Meggendorfer.
We introduce a framework for approximate analysis of Markov decision processes (MDP) with bounded-, unbounded-, and infinite-horizon properties. The main idea is to identify a "core" of an MDP, i.e., a subsystem where we provably remain with high probability, and to avoid computation on the less relevant rest of the state space. Although we identify the core using simulations and statistical techniques, it allows for rigorous error bounds in the analysis. Consequently, we obtain efficient analysis algorithms based on partial exploration for various settings, including the challenging case of strongly connected systems.

2. Verification of Flat FIFO Systems

Alain Finkel ; M. Praveen.
The decidability and complexity of reachability problems and model-checking for flat counter machines have been explored in detail. However, only few results are known for flat (lossy) FIFO machines, only in some particular cases (a single loop or a single bounded expression). We prove, by establishing reductions between properties, and by reducing SAT to a subset of these properties that many verification problems like reachability, non-termination, unboundedness are NP-complete for flat FIFO machines, generalizing similar existing results for flat counter machines. We also show that reachability is NP-complete for flat lossy FIFO machines and for flat front-lossy FIFO machines. We construct a trace-flattable system of many counter machines communicating via rendez-vous that is bisimilar to a given flat FIFO machine, which allows to model-check the original flat FIFO machine. Our results lay the theoretical foundations and open the way to build a verification tool for (general) FIFO machines based on analysis of flat sub-machines.

3. The Complexity of Subgame Perfect Equilibria in Quantitative Reachability Games

Thomas Brihaye ; Véronique Bruyère ; Aline Goeminne ; Jean-François Raskin ; Marie van den Bogaard.
We study multiplayer quantitative reachability games played on a finite directed graph, where the objective of each player is to reach his target set of vertices as quickly as possible. Instead of the well-known notion of Nash equilibrium (NE), we focus on the notion of subgame perfect equilibrium (SPE), a refinement of NE well-suited in the framework of games played on graphs. It is known that there always exists an SPE in quantitative reachability games and that the constrained existence problem is decidable. We here prove that this problem is PSPACE-complete. To obtain this result, we propose a new algorithm that iteratively builds a set of constraints characterizing the set of SPE outcomes in quantitative reachability games. This set of constraints is obtained by iterating an operator that reinforces the constraints up to obtaining a fixpoint. With this fixpoint, the set of SPE outcomes can be represented by a finite graph of size at most exponential. A careful inspection of the computation allows us to establish PSPACE membership.

4. Life is Random, Time is Not: Markov Decision Processes with Window Objectives

Thomas Brihaye ; Florent Delgrange ; Youssouf Oualhadj ; Mickael Randour.
The window mechanism was introduced by Chatterjee et al. to strengthen classical game objectives with time bounds. It permits to synthesize system controllers that exhibit acceptable behaviors within a configurable time frame, all along their infinite execution, in contrast to the traditional objectives that only require correctness of behaviors in the limit. The window concept has proved its interest in a variety of two-player zero-sum games because it enables reasoning about such time bounds in system specifications, but also thanks to the increased tractability that it usually yields. In this work, we extend the window framework to stochastic environments by considering Markov decision processes. A fundamental problem in this context is the threshold probability problem: given an objective it aims to synthesize strategies that guarantee satisfying runs with a given probability. We solve it for the usual variants of window objectives, where either the time frame is set as a parameter, or we ask if such a time frame exists. We develop a generic approach for window-based objectives and instantiate it for the classical mean-payoff and parity objectives, already considered in games. Our work paves the way to a wide use of the window mechanism in stochastic models.

5. Computing Probabilistic Bisimilarity Distances for Probabilistic Automata

Giorgio Bacci ; Giovanni Bacci ; Kim G. Larsen ; Radu Mardare ; Qiyi Tang ; Franck van Breugel.
The probabilistic bisimilarity distance of Deng et al. has been proposed as a robust quantitative generalization of Segala and Lynch's probabilistic bisimilarity for probabilistic automata. In this paper, we present a characterization of the bisimilarity distance as the solution of a simple stochastic game. The characterization gives us an algorithm to compute the distances by applying Condon's simple policy iteration on these games. The correctness of Condon's approach, however, relies on the assumption that the games are stopping. Our games may be non-stopping in general, yet we are able to prove termination for this extended class of games. Already other algorithms have been proposed in the literature to compute these distances, with complexity in $\textbf{UP} \cap \textbf{coUP}$ and \textbf{PPAD}. Despite the theoretical relevance, these algorithms are inefficient in practice. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm is the first practical solution. The characterization of the probabilistic bisimilarity distance mentioned above crucially uses a dual presentation of the Hausdorff distance due to Mémoli. As an additional contribution, in this paper we show that Mémoli's result can be used also to prove that the bisimilarity distance bounds the difference in the maximal (or minimal) probability of two states to satisfying arbitrary $\omega$-regular properties, expressed, eg., as LTL formulas.

6. Determinacy in Discrete-Bidding Infinite-Duration Games

Milad Aghajohari ; Guy Avni ; Thomas A. Henzinger.
In two-player games on graphs, the players move a token through a graph to produce an infinite path, which determines the winner of the game. Such games are central in formal methods since they model the interaction between a non-terminating system and its environment. In bidding games the players bid for the right to move the token: in each round, the players simultaneously submit bids, and the higher bidder moves the token and pays the other player. Bidding games are known to have a clean and elegant mathematical structure that relies on the ability of the players to submit arbitrarily small bids. Many applications, however, require a fixed granularity for the bids, which can represent, for example, the monetary value expressed in cents. We study, for the first time, the combination of discrete-bidding and infinite-duration games. Our most important result proves that these games form a large determined subclass of concurrent games, where determinacy is the strong property that there always exists exactly one player who can guarantee winning the game. In particular, we show that, in contrast to non-discrete bidding games, the mechanism with which tied bids are resolved plays an important role in discrete-bidding games. We study several natural tie-breaking mechanisms and show that, while some do not admit determinacy, most natural mechanisms imply determinacy for every pair of initial budgets.

7. Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency

Sidi Mohamed Beillahi ; Ahmed Bouajjani ; Constantin Enea.
Distributed storage systems and databases are widely used by various types of applications. Transactional access to these storage systems is an important abstraction allowing application programmers to consider blocks of actions (i.e., transactions) as executing atomically. For performance reasons, the consistency models implemented by modern databases are weaker than the standard serializability model, which corresponds to the atomicity abstraction of transactions executing over a sequentially consistent memory. Causal consistency for instance is one such model that is widely used in practice. In this paper, we investigate application-specific relationships between several variations of causal consistency and we address the issue of verifying automatically if a given transactional program is robust against causal consistency, i.e., all its behaviors when executed over an arbitrary causally consistent database are serializable. We show that programs without write-write races have the same set of behaviors under all these variations, and we show that checking robustness is polynomial time reducible to a state reachability problem in transactional programs over a sequentially consistent shared memory. A surprising corollary of the latter result is that causal consistency variations which admit incomparable sets of behaviors admit comparable sets of robust programs. This reduction also opens the door to leveraging existing methods and tools for the verification of concurrent […]

8. A Sound Algorithm for Asynchronous Session Subtyping and its Implementation

Mario Bravetti ; Marco Carbone ; Julien Lange ; Nobuko Yoshida ; Gianluigi Zavattaro.
Session types, types for structuring communication between endpoints in distributed systems, are recently being integrated into mainstream programming languages. In practice, a very important notion for dealing with such types is that of subtyping, since it allows for typing larger classes of system, where a program has not precisely the expected behaviour but a similar one. Unfortunately, recent work has shown that subtyping for session types in an asynchronous setting is undecidable. To cope with this negative result, the only approaches we are aware of either restrict the syntax of session types or limit communication (by considering forms of bounded asynchrony). Both approaches are too restrictive in practice, hence we proceed differently by presenting an algorithm for checking subtyping which is sound, but not complete (in some cases it terminates without returning a decisive verdict). The algorithm is based on a tree representation of the coinductive definition of asynchronous subtyping; this tree could be infinite, and the algorithm checks for the presence of finite witnesses of infinite successful subtrees. Furthermore, we provide a tool that implements our algorithm. We use this tool to test our algorithm on many examples that cannot be managed with the previous approaches, and to provide an empirical evaluation of the time and space cost of the algorithm.

9. Stubborn Set Reduction for Two-Player Reachability Games

Frederik Meyer Bønneland ; Peter Gjøl Jensen ; Kim Guldstrand Larsen ; Marco Muñiz ; Jiří Srba.
Partial order reductions have been successfully applied to model checking of concurrent systems and practical applications of the technique show nontrivial reduction in the size of the explored state space. We present a theory of partial order reduction based on stubborn sets in the game-theoretical setting of 2-player games with reachability objectives. Our stubborn reduction allows us to prune the interleaving behaviour of both players in the game, and we formally prove its correctness on the class of games played on general labelled transition systems. We then instantiate the framework to the class of weighted Petri net games with inhibitor arcs and provide its efficient implementation in the model checker TAPAAL. Finally, we evaluate our stubborn reduction on several case studies and demonstrate its efficiency.

10. Synthesis of Data Word Transducers

Léo Exibard ; Emmanuel Filiot ; Pierre-Alain Reynier.
In reactive synthesis, the goal is to automatically generate an implementation from a specification of the reactive and non-terminating input/output behaviours of a system. Specifications are usually modelled as logical formulae or automata over infinite sequences of signals ($\omega$-words), while implementations are represented as transducers. In the classical setting, the set of signals is assumed to be finite. In this paper, we consider data $\omega$-words instead, i.e., words over an infinite alphabet. In this context, we study specifications and implementations respectively given as automata and transducers extended with a finite set of registers. We consider different instances, depending on whether the specification is nondeterministic, universal or deterministic, and depending on whether the number of registers of the implementation is given or not. In the unbounded setting, we show undecidability for both universal and nondeterministic specifications, while decidability is recovered in the deterministic case. In the bounded setting, undecidability still holds for nondeterministic specifications, but can be recovered by disallowing tests over input data. The generic technique we use to show the latter result allows us to reprove some known result, namely decidability of bounded synthesis for universal specifications.

11. Reconfiguration and Message Losses in Parameterized Broadcast Networks

Nathalie Bertrand ; Patricia Bouyer ; Anirban Majumdar.
Broadcast networks allow one to model networks of identical nodes communicating through message broadcasts. Their parameterized verification aims at proving a property holds for any number of nodes, under any communication topology, and on all possible executions. We focus on the coverability problem which dually asks whether there exists an execution that visits a configuration exhibiting some given state of the broadcast protocol. Coverability is known to be undecidable for static networks, i.e. when the number of nodes and communication topology is fixed along executions. In contrast, it is decidable in PTIME when the communication topology may change arbitrarily along executions, that is for reconfigurable networks. Surprisingly, no lower nor upper bounds on the minimal number of nodes, or the minimal length of covering execution in reconfigurable networks, appear in the literature. In this paper we show tight bounds for cutoff and length, which happen to be linear and quadratic, respectively, in the number of states of the protocol. We also introduce an intermediary model with static communication topology and non-deterministic message losses upon sending. We show that the same tight bounds apply to lossy networks, although, reconfigurable executions may be linearly more succinct than lossy executions. Finally, we show NP-completeness for the natural optimisation problem associated with the cutoff.